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Loading F-18 Fire Shell on USS Gerald R Ford

NORFOLK (Nov. 4, 2019) Sailors assigned to USS Gerald R. Ford’s (CVN 78) air department onload an F/A-18 Hornet shell onto the ship’s flight deck. The aircraft shell will be used for training by Sailors to simulate firefighting response to aircraft casualties. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Angel Thuy Jaskuloski)

One of the most important roles on any ship is ensuring fire protection. The US Navy’s latest Super Carrier, the USS Gerald R Ford, is no exception.

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USS Stennis November Flight Ops in Atlantic

An F/A-18F Super Hornet, assigned to Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 106, launches from the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) in the Atlantic Ocean, Nov. 5, 2019. The John C. Stennis is underway conducting routine operations in support of Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Grant G. Grady)

The USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) conducting flight operations in the Atlantic. The Stennis, when fully crewed, has a capacity of more than 6,000 officers and crew.

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F-22 Raptors Landing in Alaska

Raptors were flown by Reserve pilots assigned to the 302nd Fighter Squadron

Raptors Return

Raptors assigned to Joint Base Elmendorf Richardson, Alaska land during the Reserve Unit Training Assembly weekend March 9. The Raptors were flown by Reserve pilots assigned to the 302nd Fighter Squadron during the 477th Fighter Groups monthly training weekend. During the week the 477th Fighter Group, Alaska’s only Reserve unit, integrates with the active duty 3rd Wing.

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Refueling a Warthog at Night

How difficult is Aerial Refueling?

One of the most challenging exercises military pilots must perform is refueling their aircraft from a tanker jet midair. It takes years of training to become proficient at this task, and it requires intense sustained focus every time to perform successfully.

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It’s Aircraft Carrier Month! USS Ford Takes the Stage

US Navy Celebrates Aircraft Carrier Month in November

Today kicks off National Aircraft Carrier month here in the US! It’s a month-long celebration of these behemoth ships. The US Navy is by far the world’s largest operator aircraft carriers, so there will be plenty to see!

We’ll start it off with some stunning footage of the USS Gerald R Ford (CVN 78) undergoing high speed turn tests for the first time earlier this week. Your jaw might drop from the size of these ships, but just wait until you see how maneuverable they are!

Get ready to strap down the flight deck – it’s about to get a little rough.

While the Ford project has had some serious delays and cost overruns, this is still a very gratifying test to see completed successfully. Finally she’s out on the seas, and showing what she’s capable of!

More Carriers All Month Long

Remember today is just the start of Aircraft Carrier Month! We have some pretty incredible content lined up that we’re very excited to show. Keep checking back often.

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A-10 Strafing Run Cockpit POV: Killer View

A-10 Thunderbolt II Cockpit Footage of a 190th Fighter Squadron, 124th Fighter Wing, Idaho Air National Guard, dropping live bombs and conducting flying operations June 8, 2019 for Green Flag-West at Nellis AFB, Nevada.

A-10 Strafing Run Video

The sheer power shown in the above video is incredible. The 30 mm rounds fired by the A-10 are devastating to any targets that are hit, which are usually numerous considering the aircraft’s accuracy. Re-watching the video a few times gives you an even better impression of the effects of the weapon on the aircraft, and the pilot’s deadly precision despite it.

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Monetize the US Military Update YouTube Channel! #TeamYouTube

About a year ago the US Military Update channel on YouTube, devoted entirely to promoting the missions and work of the US Military Servicemembers, was de-monetized by the YouTube Team. Despite our millions of views, tens of thousands of loyal fans, and hundreds of videos, YouTube decided we didn’t deserve any of the revenue from ads shown during our videos. Our appeal earlier this year was also denied.

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US Special Forces Al-Baghdadi Raid Location & Details

Fewer than 100 Troops, Hours on the Ground

Details of an overnight raid against ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi by US Special Forces are starting to emerge. According to US Defense Secretary Mark Esper, in an interview with ABC Sunday morning, the raid involved fewer than 100 US troops who were on the ground in Syria for over two hours at al-Baghdadi’s compound.

Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi

The raid resulted in the death of al-Baghdadi, who blew himself up with a suicide vest, according to Esper.

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F-22 Raptor Radar Cross-Section: Bird, bee, fly?

Flying Invisibly

The F-22 Raptor is known for its stealth capabilities worldwide. Years before its introduction into service, adversaries were already clamoring to develop radar defenses able to see it. Even in 2019 it remains as elusive as it is awesome. Below we’ll take a look at the F-22’s radar cross-section, and how its able to slip through air defenses undetected.

A 1st Fighter Wing’s F-22 Raptor from Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va. pulls into position to accept fuel from a KC-135 Stratotanker with the 756th Air Refueling Squadron, Joint Base Andrews Naval Air Facility, Md. off the east coast on May 10, 2012. The first Raptor assigned to the Wing arrived Jan. 7, 2005. This aircraft was allocated as a trainer, and was docked in a hanger for maintenance personnel to familiarize themselves with its complex systems. The second Raptor, designated for flying operations, arrived Jan. 18, 2005. On Dec. 15, 2005, Air Combat Command commander, along with the 1 FW commander, announced the 27th Fighter Squadron as fully operational capable to fly, fight and win with the F-22. (U.S. Air Force Photo/Master Sgt. Jeremy Lock)
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US Fighter Jet Aggressor Squadrons – Colorful Camo with a Bite

Colorful Camo Schemes

Aggressor Squadrons are known for their colorful camouflage paint schemes, which are designed to mimic the camo types often used by adversary forces. Aggressors serve as the enemy aircraft in training exercises, so US and allied pilots get familiar with recognizing and fighting against aircraft with these unusual appearances.

A U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcon from Eielson Air Force Base, flies in formation over the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, July 18, 2019. The JPARC is a 67,000 plus square mile area, providing a realistic training environment commanders leverage for full spectrum engagements, ranging from individual skills to complex, large-scale joint engagements. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. James Richardson)
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F-22 Raptor Minimum Radius Turn Composite Image

A U.S. Air Force F-22 Raptor performs the stiff pitch above the AirPower over Hampton Roads Open House crowd at Langley Air Force Base, Va., May 18, 2018. In its demonstration, the aircraft showed stealth, supercruise, maneuverability, and integrated avionic warfighting capabilities.

Thrust Vectoring around the corner

A U.S. Air Force F-22 Raptor performs the stiff pitch above the AirPower over Hampton Roads Open House crowd at Langley Air Force Base, Va., May 18, 2018. In its demonstration, the aircraft showed stealth, supercruise, maneuverability, and integrated avionic warfighting capabilities.

Check out the incredible composite image below showing the F-22 Raptor performing a Minimum Radius Turn. The Raptor is able to turn so tightly due to the thrust vectoring capabilities of its two powerful afterburning engines. As the angle of the thrust increases, the engines literally start pushing the jet tighter into the turn, leading to some truly incredible maneuvers.

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SR-71 Blackbird – Surprising Fact

The Fastest Plane in the World

In this day of computers and drones, it’s easy to forget just how incredible this plane was. It still holds the all-time record as the fastest manned aircraft in the world, a title it’s held since 1976. Check out more surprising facts, as well as some incredible photos and videos, of the SR-71 Blackbird below.

SR-71 with dual max afterburners during 1998 engine test

How detailed was the SR-71 camera?

The effort, cost, and danger of the SR-71 program is readily apparent, especially considering the space suits required for pilots to fly the plane at its cruising altitude. All of this was expended and endured just to take some photos. What was so great about them? This brings us to the first surprising fact about the SR-71.

NASA researches received three SR-71s on loan from the Air Force after the program was canceled for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. (NASA photo)

SR-71 Blackbird could produce images detailed enough to…

SR-71 Surprising Fact #1:
The camera on the SR-71 Blackbird could produce images detailed enough to read a car license plate from 80,000 feet. This fact was published by the Airman, the US Air Force’s official magazine. That might help explain why so much energy and money were poured into this program over the years.

An SR-71 Blackbird lands in the rain at an undisclosed location. (U.S. Air Force photo)
History timeline of the SR-71 Blackbird