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F-35 Over Chicago

Capt. Andrew “Dojo” Olson, F-35 Heritage Flight Team pilot and commander performs a high speed pass in an F-35A Lightning II over Lake Michigan during the Chicago Air and Water Show in Chicago, Illinois, Aug. 19, 2018. The F-35A Lightning II is equipped with the largest single engine motor ever built and is capable of reaching speeds of up to 1,200 miles per hour. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexander Cook)

Capt. Andrew “Dojo” Olson, F-35 Heritage Flight Team pilot and commander performs a high speed pass in an F-35A Lightning II over Lake Michigan during the Chicago Air and Water Show in Chicago, Illinois, Aug. 19, 2018. The F-35A Lightning II is equipped with the largest single engine motor ever built and is capable of reaching speeds of up to 1,200 miles per hour. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexander Cook)

Capt. Andrew “Dojo” Olson, F-35 Heritage Flight Team pilot and commander performs a high speed pass in an F-35A Lightning II over Lake Michigan during the Chicago Air and Water Show in Chicago, Illinois, Aug. 19, 2018. The F-35A Lightning II is equipped with the largest single engine motor ever built and is capable of reaching speeds of up to 1,200 miles per hour. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexander Cook)

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WHOA! F-35 High-Speed Pass Over Chicago

Capt. Andrew “Dojo” Olson, F-35 Heritage Flight Team pilot and commander performs a high-speed pass in an F-35A Lightning II over Lake Michigan during the Chicago Air and Water Show in Chicago, Illinois, Aug. 19, 2018. The F-35A Lightning II is equipped with the largest single engine motor ever built and is capable of reaching speeds of up to 1,200 miles per hour. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexander Cook)

Capt. Andrew “Dojo” Olson, F-35 Heritage Flight Team pilot and commander performs a high-speed pass in an F-35A Lightning II over Lake Michigan during the Chicago Air and Water Show in Chicago, Illinois, Aug. 19, 2018. The F-35A Lightning II is equipped with the largest single engine motor ever built and is capable of reaching speeds of up to 1,200 miles per hour. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexander Cook)

Capt. Andrew “Dojo” Olson, F-35 Heritage Flight Team pilot and commander performs a high-speed pass in an F-35A Lightning II over Lake Michigan during the Chicago Air and Water Show in Chicago, Illinois, Aug. 19, 2018. The F-35A Lightning II is equipped with the largest single engine motor ever built and is capable of reaching speeds of up to 1,200 miles per hour. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexander Cook)

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F-35A First Operational Strafing Run

Pilots from the 388th Fighter Wing’s 4th Fighter Squadron were the first operational unit to fire the F-35A’s 25 mm cannon in a strafing run during training. The two-ship formation fired on two sets of ground targets on the Utah Test and Training range Aug. 13. Loading and firing the cannon was one of the few capabilities Airmen in the 388th and 419th FWs had yet to demonstrate. The F-35A’s internal cannon allows the aircraft to maintain stealth against air adversaries as well as fire more accurately on ground targets, giving pilots more tactical flexibility. (U.S. Air Force photo by Todd Cromar)

Airman Baltazar Enriquez, Staff Sgt. Karl Tesch and Airman 1st Class Emily Villela, 4th Aircraft Maintenance Unit, preform the first-time operational loading of 25 mm target rounds in an F-35A Lightning II, Aug. 10, 2018, at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. (U.S. Air Force photo by Todd Cromar)

Airman Baltazar Enriquez, Staff Sgt. Karl Tesch and Airman 1st Class Emily Villela, 4th Aircraft Maintenance Unit, preform the first-time operational loading of 25 mm target rounds in an F-35A Lightning II, Aug. 10, 2018, at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. (U.S. Air Force photo by Todd Cromar)

 

Airman 1st Class Emily Villela and Airman Baltazar Enriquez, 4th Aircraft Maintenance Unit, accomplish the first-time operational loading of 25 mm target rounds in an F-35A Lightning II, Aug. 10, 2018, at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. (U.S. Air Force photo by Todd Cromar)

Airman 1st Class Emily Villela and Airman Baltazar Enriquez, 4th Aircraft Maintenance Unit, accomplish the first-time operational loading of 25 mm target rounds in an F-35A Lightning II, Aug. 10, 2018, at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. (U.S. Air Force photo by Todd Cromar)

 

Pilots from the 388th Fighter Wing’s 4th Fighter Squadron were the first operational unit to fire the F-35A’s 25 mm cannon in a strafing run during training. The two-ship formation fired on two sets of ground targets on the Utah Test and Training range Aug. 13. Loading and firing the cannon was one of the few capabilities Airmen in the 388th and 419th FWs had yet to demonstrate. The F-35A’s internal cannon allows the aircraft to maintain stealth against air adversaries as well as fire more accurately on ground targets, giving pilots more tactical flexibility. (U.S. Air Force photo by Todd Cromar)

Pilots from the 388th Fighter Wing’s 4th Fighter Squadron were the first operational unit to fire the F-35A’s 25 mm cannon in a strafing run during training. The two-ship formation fired on two sets of ground targets on the Utah Test and Training range Aug. 13. Loading and firing the cannon was one of the few capabilities Airmen in the 388th and 419th FWs had yet to demonstrate. The F-35A’s internal cannon allows the aircraft to maintain stealth against air adversaries as well as fire more accurately on ground targets, giving pilots more tactical flexibility. (U.S. Air Force photo by Todd Cromar)

 

Pilots from the 388th Fighter Wing’s 4th Fighter Squadron were the first operational unit to fire the F-35A’s 25 mm cannon in a strafing run during training. The two-ship formation fired on two sets of ground targets on the Utah Test and Training range Aug. 13. Loading and firing the cannon was one of the few capabilities Airmen in the 388th and 419th FWs had yet to demonstrate. The F-35A’s internal cannon allows the aircraft to maintain stealth against air adversaries as well as fire more accurately on ground targets, giving pilots more tactical flexibility. (U.S. Air Force photo by Todd Cromar)

Pilots from the 388th Fighter Wing’s 4th Fighter Squadron were the first operational unit to fire the F-35A’s 25 mm cannon in a strafing run during training. The two-ship formation fired on two sets of ground targets on the Utah Test and Training range Aug. 13. Loading and firing the cannon was one of the few capabilities Airmen in the 388th and 419th FWs had yet to demonstrate. The F-35A’s internal cannon allows the aircraft to maintain stealth against air adversaries as well as fire more accurately on ground targets, giving pilots more tactical flexibility. (U.S. Air Force photo by Todd Cromar)

 

Pilots from the 388th Fighter Wing’s 4th Fighter Squadron were the first operational unit to fire the F-35A’s 25 mm cannon in a strafing run during training. The two-ship formation fired on two sets of ground targets on the Utah Test and Training range Aug. 13. Loading and firing the cannon was one of the few capabilities Airmen in the 388th and 419th FWs had yet to demonstrate. The F-35A’s internal cannon allows the aircraft to maintain stealth against air adversaries as well as fire more accurately on ground targets, giving pilots more tactical flexibility. (Air Force photo by Todd Cromar)

Pilots from the 388th Fighter Wing’s 4th Fighter Squadron were the first operational unit to fire the F-35A’s 25 mm cannon in a strafing run during training. The two-ship formation fired on two sets of ground targets on the Utah Test and Training range Aug. 13. Loading and firing the cannon was one of the few capabilities Airmen in the 388th and 419th FWs had yet to demonstrate. The F-35A’s internal cannon allows the aircraft to maintain stealth against air adversaries as well as fire more accurately on ground targets, giving pilots more tactical flexibility. (Air Force photo by Todd Cromar)